Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Donald Trump Surges, Clinton and Sanders Tied In Latest Poll

Billionaire Donald Trump has surged to a commanding two-to-one lead among Republican voters nationwide in the race for the GOP Presidential nomination while Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remain in a statistical tie for the Democratic Presidential nomination, according to a Quinnipiac University National poll released today.

According to the poll conducted from From February 10 - 15, 39% of Republican voters would vote for Trump, his highest total so far, followed by Florida Senator Marco Rubio with 19% and Texas Senator Ted Cruz at 18%. Ohio Governor John Kasich trails far behind at 6% with former Florida Govenor Jeb Bush and Dr. Ben Carson at 4% each. Nine percent of Republican voters still remain undecided.  

The latest poll shows Trump gaining momentum when compared to the results of a February 5 poll that had Trump at 31%, Cruz with 22% and Rubio with 19%. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina dropped out of the race on February 10.

"Reports of Donald Trump's imminent demise as a candidate are clearly and greatly exaggerated. Like a freight train barreling through signals with his horn on full blast, Trump heads down the track towards a possible nomination," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll.

Trump has a good chance of winning in November, 77% of Republican voters nationwide say, while 61% say Rubio has a good chance of winning and 60% say Cruz has a good chance.

In the Democratic race nationwide, Clinton has 44% versus Sanders at 42 percent, and 11 percent undecided - unchanged from February 5.

"Sen. Bernie Sanders and Secretary Hillary Clinton are neck and neck. But while Bernie has the trust, Hillary has the experience. Two different measurements of two dissimilar candidates," Malloy said.

From February 10 - 15, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,342 registered voters nationwide with a margin of error of +/- 2.7 percentage points. Live interviewers call land lines and cell phones. The survey includes 602 Republicans with a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points and 563 Democrats with a margin of error of +/- 4.1 percentage points.