Thursday, June 28, 2012

Attorney General Eric Holder Found in Contempt

WASHINGTON – U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder was found by the U.S. House of Representatives to be in contempt of Congress by a vote of 255 to 67.  The basis for the contempt citation is the failure to produce documents relating to the congressional investigation of Fast and Furious.  


RELATED STORIES:  Did Central Florida Benefit From An Obama Administration Conspiracy? 



On the heels of the House’s upcoming vote to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress, Representative Sandy Adams (FL-24) spoke on the House floor regarding Operation Fast and Furious. Adams served as a deputy sheriff in the Orange County Sheriff’s Office for over 17 years.  While working there, she lost her husband in the line of duty. 


While speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, Adams said:


"I am going to come to you from a different angle; one of a law enforcement officer.  I served over 17 years as a law enforcement officer. I worked many undercover operations. And as a law enforcement officer, we knew you don’t give guns to bad guys – the drug cartels, they are bad guys.  You know that if you let a gun walk with a bad guy, you’re going to see that gun whether it is at a crime scene, or you are going to be looking down the barrel of it.  


So when the Attorney General came to our committee, I asked him: ‘Who approved this operation?’ ‘Why was it approved?’ And he said…he just wouldn’t answer, he didn’t know. Okay, well, what rises to the level of the Attorney General if an international operation that allows guns to walk to another country, and are used to kill one of our agents, and used to kill and maim their citizens? Does it rise to his level of approval? Who approved it?


This is something that is just normal procedures in a law enforcement agency, in any operation. So now you have an Attorney General who won’t tell us, or can’t tell us, who approved this international operation.  You have others saying, ‘Well this is something that started under another administration.’ Well, it didn’t. It was a different operation that they realized they couldn’t keep up with those guns, so they stopped it. 


When this one started it was flawed from the very beginning. The Attorney General said it was flawed from the beginning. And yet, we still have no answers.  We don’t have answers. The American people don’t have answers, and most importantly the Terry family doesn’t have answers. And that’s just unacceptable.  


Let me just say this: I have heard from the other side of the aisle and from my colleagues here today that this is political.  This isn’t political – to me, it’s personal.  We have a law enforcement officer doing his job who was killed by a flawed operation that no one will take ownership of in the Attorney General’s office.  And the Attorney General himself won’t tell us what rises to the level of his knowing what is going on at his agency if an international operation does not. 


So I will tell you this, it was not political when I started looking into this, and when we started looking into it.  It is not political today.  And the way that it became political was when it was asserted right before the gavel dropped in the committee, an executive privilege.