Thursday, November 10, 2011

Rick Perry Commits Speechicide

Texas Governor Rick Perry all but ended his chance for winning the Republican Presidential Primary after he was unable to name the three federal agencies that he wanted to eliminate during last night's CNBC debate held at Oakland University in Rochester Michigan.

The stumped Texas Governor turned to U.S. Representative Ron Paul for help.  Ron Paul did his best to help Rick Perry remember, but in the end, it was futile.

This is not the first time Rick Perry has been stumped at the podium.  During last month's CNN Las Vegas Republican Presidential Primary Debate, Rick Perry froze briefly when trying to address nuclear energy which was pointed out in last month's debate highlights by BrevardTimes.com Here

As for the other candidates, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul have so much experience discussing political issues during interviews on national television that it comes second nature to them.  But they both can't help but try to intellectually address complex political and economic issues that America faces which can't be done in 30 seconds.

Hermain Cain gave a smooth delivery as usual, returning to the message of his 9-9-9 plan (leave it to a pizza ceo to use marketing to sell an economic plan like Domino's 5-5-5 deal). 

Herman Cain caught a lucky break because everyone will be talking about Rick Perry in the morning rather than the sexual harassment allegations. 

Mitt Romney seemed a bit disheveled during the debate.  Who would have ever expected a Wall Street millionaire to be wearing a crooked tie and wrinkled shirt?  

While wardrobe shouldn't be a factor in determining a president, the crooked tie and wrinkled shirt made Romney look as though he was under stress and defensive - the 2012 version of Richard Nixon's infamous five o'clock shadow.

When asked if the U.S. should bailout Europe and Italy, Mitt Romney responded "I'm happy to continue to participate in world efforts like the World Bank and the IMF, but I'm not happy to have the United States government put in place a TARP-like program to try and save U.S. banks that have Italian debt, foreign banks doing business in the U.S. that have Italian debt, or European banks."